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  • #46
    Re: Replacement Tires

    Originally posted by 007Cruiser View Post
    Bridgestone currently has a $70 rebate if you buy four.
    Thinking of getting directional tires.
    Tire Rotation would be front to back, no LF to RR or RF to LR.

    HKS

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    • #47
      Re: Replacement Tires

      Like Gary, I also have the Goodyear Assurance Fuel Max 55's, but I normally keep them @ 33 psi.

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      • #48
        Re: Replacement Tires

        Originally posted by 2K2BIRD View Post
        Like Gary, I also have the Goodyear Assurance Fuel Max 55's, but I normally keep them @ 33 psi.
        Paul, Gary,

        The tire pressure (33-34) you chose for the 55s, makes sense to me. A taller tire sidewall equals a softer ride, therefor a little more air makes sense.
        Thanks

        HKS

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        • #49
          Re: Replacement Tires

          Below is a column from today's San Jose Mercury-News. Should be noted by all who have purchased low mileage 'Birds. Tires should be gauged both by mileage and time. Dot Lang's Porthole Authority has the details on ordering the Maxxis spare.

          Steering You Right
          A reader writes:
          “How about reminding your readers that they might need to replace their spare tire in their old cars? I had a spare in my 12-year-old Jeep, put it on when I had a flat and a few weeks later had a blowout on that tire. It was pretty hairy, and after talking to some tire guys I now know, the spare should have been replaced.”
          Great reminder. Thank you.
          Most tire manufacturers say you should replace any tire that’s six to 10 years old, even if it hasn’t ever been used on the road. The materials in tires degrade over time, putting them at pretty high risk of failure as the years go on.
          To find out how old your spare is, look on the sidewall. The last four digits of the Tire Identification Number (TIN) indicate the week and the year the tire was made. (So 0406 would be the fourth week of 2006.) And remember, the model year of your car is not always identical to the year the tire was manufactured, so don’t assume. Especially if you bought the car used, there’s a decent chance they didn’t put the newest possible tire in the spare compartment.
          What’s your question? Sharon Peters would like to hear about what’s on your mind when it comes to caring for, driving and repairing your vehicle. Email Sharon@ctwfeatures.com.

          By Sharon L. Peters
          CTW FEATURES

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