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Wide White Walls

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  • #31
    Will do! And that's a great idea. Thanks!

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    • #32
      The other option is to remember the car was built in the 2000s as a tribute to past heritage, not the 1950s. Despite what some of our old minds may think or wish, whitewalls are a thing of the past. Might be time to move on. Put on 4 new OHTSU tires and save $800 or more for that next maintenance issue.
      19 years, 168K miles, 48 States X 2 & DC, 9 Canadian provinces, 8 European countries, 3 Caribbean Islands, 3 Hawaiian Islands, 100+ National Park locations, 150+ T-bird events, 190+ retrobird diecasts/models, 13 TOTM pics & some very special friends...THANKS TBN !

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      • #33
        The first ad I see for the Thunderbird without whitewalls is 1989. All others had ww, thinning as the years progressed from 1955.
        It seems whitewalls are most certainly a tribute to the past and as the 11th generation was designed with many attributes of the '55-63
        stylings, wide whites are a nice nod to the early heritage that begat them.

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        • #34
          My search for wide white walls has been a disaster. Even on the rare occasion I find a set of tires, they're out of stock. I can't even find a regular white wall tire. Oh well, thank you everyone for all your help!

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          • #35
            At the very least, the subjects have been thoroughly vetted.
            To borrow a phrase from Emile Latella,
            "Never mind".
            Now when you're feelin' low
            And the fish won't bite
            You need a little bit o' soul
            To put you right

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            • #36
              Originally posted by doc View Post
              I tried portawalls once on an old Buick special, but the minute I went on the highway, they started flopping in the wind. I'll look into the paint option.

              When I called Coker and Diamond Back, they both ask for the year of the car. Anything after 1970s they can't do because of the DOT.

              If anyone knows how I can get 2 1/2-3" white walls, please let me know. This is the best site--everyone is helpful--Thanks! So I'll keep trying to find these tires.
              There is a technique to installing Port-A-Walls and there is a video on the web site I posted above describing the process.
              If they're installed wrong then yeah its a problem. I worked at various car dealers in the 60s and they were quite popular and worked well when installed properly.

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              • #37
                Looks like most port -a -walls are coming from Turkey!

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                • #38
                  Potta Walls were junk in the 50's and I suspect they still are.
                  sigpic

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by BLACK BEAUTY View Post
                    Looks like most port -a -walls are coming from Turkey!
                    Turkey exports $177 billion to the world in goods annually. Much of it in cars, trucks, and vehicle parts. Lots of tiles and ceramics, jewelry, textiles, etc., too, but it's difficult to
                    determine how much in Port-a-walls. I'm surprised they aren't made in China, too.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by JerriLampon View Post

                      Turkey exports $177 billion to the world in goods annually. Much of it in cars, trucks, and vehicle parts. Lots of tiles and ceramics, jewelry, textiles, etc., too, but it's difficult to
                      determine how much in Port-a-walls. I'm surprised they aren't made in China, too.
                      I was stationed in TUrkey while in the Army Security Agency in the 70s - they are amazing craftsmen.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Frank Dreano View Post
                        I was stationed in TUrkey while in the Army Security Agency in the 70s - they are amazing craftsmen.
                        Yes, I'm surprised Turkey is still considered an "emerging country". They have thousands of years of cultures to grow on, kinda like Greece-East.

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